5 (free) things governments can do to reposition for the future

HUGH EATON | May 27, 2021

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Over the last year, we’ve all witnessed years of digital transformation in a matter of months. A recent survey from the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), sponsored by Microsoft, shows that government respondents were the second-most likely group (after financial services) to report increased investment in digital transformation since the start of the pandemic. As governments around the world continue to look to technology and innovation to respond to the challenges of today, here are five (free) things governments are doing to step-change the way they can achieve their economic, social, and sustainability objectives in the future.

Spotlight

Auditor of State - Ohio

Under the direction of Auditor Dave Yost, the Auditor of State's office is responsible for auditing and providing financial services to all public offices in Ohio. This encompasses more than 5,800 entities including cities, counties, villages, townships, schools, state universities and public libraries as well as all state agencies, boards and commissions. The office is staffed with more than 800 auditors and other professionals and is divided among eight regions, including a state region.

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The construction project will include code upgrades and the upgrading of air conditioning equipment, sprinkler systems, and heating units. A secure elevator will be added in the existing courthouse to move prisoners. These projects are indicative of what can be found by researching upcoming contracting opportunities. Each new project also will require additional purchases related to technology, security, upgraded equipment, furniture, office supplies, landscaping, and numerous professional services. The government marketplace is still one of the hottest places to find abundant opportunities for private sector firms. Mary Scott Nabers is president and CEO of Strategic Partnerships Inc., a business development company specializing in government contracting and procurement consulting throughout the U.S. Her recently released book, Inside the Infrastructure Revolution: A Roadmap for Building America, is a handbook for contractors, investors and the public at large seeking to explore how public-private partnerships or joint ventures can help finance their infrastructure projects.

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Spotlight

Auditor of State - Ohio

Under the direction of Auditor Dave Yost, the Auditor of State's office is responsible for auditing and providing financial services to all public offices in Ohio. This encompasses more than 5,800 entities including cities, counties, villages, townships, schools, state universities and public libraries as well as all state agencies, boards and commissions. The office is staffed with more than 800 auditors and other professionals and is divided among eight regions, including a state region.

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