Attestiv and Carahsoft Partner to Bring Revolutionary Technology to Government Agencies

Attestiv | October 09, 2020

Attestiv and Carahsoft Partner to Bring Revolutionary Technology to Government Agencies
Attestiv, a tamper-proof media validation platform and product provider, and Carahsoft Technology Corp., The Trusted Government IT Solutions Provider®, today announced a partnership. Under the agreement, Carahsoft will make Attestiv’s industry-leading authentication and detection solutions available to the public sector through Carahsoft’s NASA Solutions for Enterprise-Wide Procurement (SEWP) V, National Association of State Procurement Officials (NASPO) ValuePoint, National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA) and OMNIA Partners contracts and through the company’s reseller partners.

Spotlight

The government wants the UK to be the safest place in the world to go online, and the best place to start and grow a digital business. Given the prevalence of illegal and harmful content online, and the level of public concern about online harms, not just in the UK but worldwide, we believe that the digital economy urgently needs a new regulatory framework to improve our citizens’ safety online. This will rebuild public confidence and set clear expectations of companies, allowing our citizens to enjoy more safely the benefits that online services offer.

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Spotlight

The government wants the UK to be the safest place in the world to go online, and the best place to start and grow a digital business. Given the prevalence of illegal and harmful content online, and the level of public concern about online harms, not just in the UK but worldwide, we believe that the digital economy urgently needs a new regulatory framework to improve our citizens’ safety online. This will rebuild public confidence and set clear expectations of companies, allowing our citizens to enjoy more safely the benefits that online services offer.