CBO says House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s drug pricing plan saves Medicare $345 billion over decade

CNBC | October 15, 2019

CBO says House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s drug pricing plan saves Medicare $345 billion over decade
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s bill to lower prescription drug prices would save Medicare $345 billion over 10 years, according to a preliminary analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office. The savings wouldn’t begin until 2023, assuming the bill gets passed by both the House and Senate and signed by President Donald Trump before the end of this year, the CBO said in the report released late Friday. The greatest savings would come in 2028 at $93 billion, according to the CBO, an independent agency that reviews congressional spending.

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To help prevent traffic crashes in road construction and maintenance work zones that injure and kill motorists and workers, Governor Scott Walker has proclaimed April 11 to 15 as Work Zone Awareness Week in Wisconsin. Last year in Wisconsin, tragic crashes killed three highway workers, including Derrick Burkhalter. This video details some of that incident. For more information on Work Zone Awareness Week, visit www.wisconsindot.gov

Spotlight

To help prevent traffic crashes in road construction and maintenance work zones that injure and kill motorists and workers, Governor Scott Walker has proclaimed April 11 to 15 as Work Zone Awareness Week in Wisconsin. Last year in Wisconsin, tragic crashes killed three highway workers, including Derrick Burkhalter. This video details some of that incident. For more information on Work Zone Awareness Week, visit www.wisconsindot.gov

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White House to Rewrite Cloud Vendor Contracts for Security Liability

White House | May 21, 2020

The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past. The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors that would update liability terms regarding security, according to the official in charge of leading federal agencies’ move to the shared-responsibility ecosystems. “I think there is a need to update our [service level agreements] with the cloud providers and we're actively working on that within [the General Services Administration],” Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center and Cloud Optimization Infrastructure Program Management Office at GSA, said. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Read More: Trump Government Moves to Cut off Huawei from Global Chip Suppliers “OMB has just stood up a [program management office] to work on a cloud SLA template for the federal government to be attached to every contract,” Santucci said when asked about the liability issue and whether cloud service providers or government customers should be held responsible for security. Security was one of the topics mentioned in establishing the new contract templates, he said. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past, according to a program manager speaking from the “frontlines” of the cloud migration effort during the DGI conference. “The common themes that I heard were ‘I don’t understand security, I don’t want to have to deal with security by myself, and I’m also not a cloud expert,’” Joe Foster, cloud computing program manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said regarding his early days of trying to get agency components to move to the cloud. In some ways, the pandemic is taking the issue out of officials’ hands. Could anyone plan for what’s going on now? Probably not, but who could imagine let alone fund it? Referring to the pandemic. The situation does exactly that. Your users are now remote rather than in a central building or campus. Agencies that are doing well are mostly in the cloud with little or no impact. Remote users do not need a [virtual private network] to gain access to their emails or files, collaboration products have significantly reduced file duplicates, and bandwidth consumption is between the home internet connection and the cloud. It’s a great success story, Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center at GSA. Outside of no longer needing to run energy-intensive data centers, there are other, security-based reasons for moving to the cloud. Enabling security and development professionals to work in the same space has allowed for changes to applications to be pushed out faster, as Susie Adams, chief technology officer for Microsoft Federal, noted, for example. But as officials at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have stressed, moving to the cloud does not make security a “set it and forget it” feature. There are a lot of configurations and other considerations that customers may be responsible for under contracts. During an event hosted Tuesday by the Information Technology Industry Council, Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., also observed the pandemic causing a rush to the cloud but expressed more trepidation than exuberance. “This comes with an increased use of personal devices and cloud services, which may not be secure,” Matsui, co-chair of the House of Representatives’ High Tech Caucus, said. Matsui on Tuesday sent a letter to NIST Director Walter Copan asking that the agency work to establish metrics to accompany its landmark Cybersecurity Framework. The framework allows entities to select and implement security controls based on their individual subjective needs and risks. Matsui’s letter calls for a way to evaluate the security implications of those decisions. “As companies, nonprofits, and state and local governments work to quickly assess their cybersecurity strategies and evaluate measures to improve security during the pandemic, additional guidance from NIST could help speed the decision-making process and funnel resources to effective, proven methods,” she wrote. “With quantifiable measurement tools, cybersecurity strategies can be compared across industries and between entities. Metrics and measurements that facilitate comparisons and assess risk will be valuable for consumers, companies, and governments.” Read More: How to secure the U.S. government’s technology supply chain

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Teal Announces Public Launch and Immediate Availability of Golden Eagle New US-Made Commercial Drone System that Provides Aerial Surveillance

Teal | September 04, 2020

Teal today announced the public launch and immediate availability of Golden Eagle, a new US-made commercial drone system that provides aerial surveillance and awareness through scalable, secure, and rugged technology. Designed and manufactured entirely in the US to ensure the highest levels of data security and performance, Teal already has pilot programs running at Fortune 500 companies, as well as many government agencies. Golden Eagle serves as a dual-use platform and was recently selected as an approved system for the Department of Defense and Federal Government as part of DIU’s Blue sUAS Project and will soon be available on the GSA schedule.

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Google Cloud Launches Zero-Trust Offerings for the Government

Google Cloud | July 21, 2021

Google Cloud today announced new Zero Trust offerings for government, a set of services designed to assist US federal, state, and local government organizations in implementing Zero Trust architecture by the Biden Administration's Executive Order on Improving the Nation's Cybersecurity and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards. Google Cloud is introducing three new service options to assist departments and agencies in meeting Zero Trust requirements: Offerings for Zero Trust Assessment and Planning: The Zero Trust Assessment and Planning solution, provided by Google Cloud's professional services organization (PSO), is intended to assist the government in meeting security objectives via Zero Trust architecture planning for key applications and data. The PSO team at Google Cloud will assist government organizations on the culture change, policies, and technology required to create a Zero Trust framework, which will be provided in phases to ensure success inside the customer's infrastructure. In addition, this new service will assist government agencies in using Google Cloud tools to support existing assets and infrastructure in the cloud, on-premises, or hybrid settings. Secure Application Access Anywhere offering: Google Cloud is also introducing Secure Application Access Anywhere, a new container-based solution for secure application access and monitoring. Secure Application Access Anywhere may be a scalable, highly responsive alternative for government network border systems. This solution, developed in collaboration with Palo Alto Networks and Google Cloud's PSO team, uses Google Cloud's Anthos to deploy and manage containers that enable secure access and monitoring for applications in the cloud or on-premises environments. A recent successful prototype of this solution with the Defense Innovation Unit (DIU)—an entity inside the Defense Department in accelerating DIU's Zero Trust journey by allowing users to access software-as-a-service (SaaS) apps directly over the internet. Active Cyber Threat Detection offering: Google Cloud's new Active Cyber Threat Detection offering may assist government organizations in rapidly determining whether they have been compromised by cyberattacks that they have not yet identified. Active Cyber Threat Detection is provided by Google Cloud partners Deloitte and Fishtech CYDERES and builds on the proven capabilities of Google Cloud's Chronicle threat hunting, detection, and investigation platform. This service will enable government organizations of all sizes to easily analyze their historical and current log data to detect risks with confidence and quickness. In addition to these new offerings, Google Cloud provides several existing solutions that assist government organizations in accelerating their journey to Zero Trust as well as protecting against and recovering from cyberattacks: • BeyondCorp Enterprise: Google's Zero Trust access solution secures access to internal web apps, SaaS applications, and cloud resources using access rules based on identity and device contextual data. It also provides customers with integrated threat and data security, such as malware and data leakage prevention and credential protection. • Google Workspace also uses Google's Zero Trust technologies to provide a secure email, communication, and collaboration solution. • Actifio GO can help organizations better respond to ransomware attacks by offering scalable and efficient incremental data protection and a unique near-instant data recovery capability. When combined, these Google Cloud services can accelerate the US government's Zero Trust efforts to defend against cyberattacks while also enhancing detection, response, and recovery from cyberattacks that do occur. About Google Cloud With the finest infrastructure, platform, industry solutions, and expertise, Google Cloud accelerates companies' ability to change their businesses digitally. We provide enterprise-grade solutions that utilize Google's cutting-edge technology – all on the industry's cleanest cloud. As a result, customers in over 200 countries and territories rely on Google Cloud as a reliable partner to help them grow and solve their most pressing business problems.

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