GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Fluree’s Data-Centric Architecture Drives Transformation for Top Governmental Entities, Amidst Backdrop of Data Decrees

Fluree | August 28, 2021

Fluree’s Data-Centric Architecture Drives Transformation for Top Governmental Entities, Amidst Backdrop of Data Decrees
Fluree, a market leader in secure data management, has been actively working with the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Department of Education as public sector entities issue data decrees amidst a broad move towards data sharing and growing concerns over cyberattacks.

Collaborative efforts ensure data integrity and secure data sharing, which can prevent future cyberattacks via Fluree’s cryptographically secured data-centric architecture. This comes amidst the backdrop of recent data decrees issued by the DOD calling for more secure and interoperable data management practices. The Biden administration has also issued an executive order on improving the nation’s security.

“Fluree is able to provide the glue for secure data-sharing. This is becoming increasingly important as cyberattacks against public and private sector entities have become more prominent and cataclysmic, inciting the issuance of recent data decrees,” Fluree Co-founder and CEO Brian Platz said. “Our data-centric architecture stack fulfills the DOD’s data decrees by maximizing data sharing and rights for data use and allowing for open and secure data sharing across multiple parties.”

Fluree’s practice of storing and executing data security at the data layer—rather than deferring permission logic to APIs and application servers—effectively allows data to defend itself under a set of enforceable conditions. To date, Fluree, an immutable graph database with cloud-native architecture, has been applied in a handful of recent government projects, including:
  • The DOD and U.S. Air Force, through the AFWERX SBIR program, have contracted Fluree to build a secure data-sharing platform.
  • The Department of Education, through the American Council on Education's Blockchain Innovation challenge, has funded UnBlockEd. This is a collaborative effort from Fluree, the Gardner Institute, University of Arizona and Georgia Tech. UnBlockEd uses blockchain technology to build verifiable learner credentials for easier transfer credit articulation.
  • The Department of Education has also funded the Lifelong Learner Project. Using blockchain technology, the Lifelong Learner Project is a collaboration of teacher-centered organizations focused on teacher licensure and professional learning.

Fluree sits at the center of the data ecosystems of tomorrow. It extends the role of the database or data lake to include provenance, interoperability, governance/security and scalability. As the demand for secure, interoperable data ecosystems gains momentum, Fluree is becoming a prominent leader in the public sector data management space.

About Fluree, PBC
Founded in 2016 by Brian Platz and Flip Filipowski, Fluree PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation headquartered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Fluree is an enterprise data management platform that guarantees data integrity, facilitates secure data sharing, and powers data-driven insights. The Fluree platform organizes blockchain-secured data in a scalable semantic graph database—establishing a foundational layer of trusted data for connected and intelligent data ecosystems.

Spotlight

Listen to AFGE's Inside Government on Federal News Radio, Friday @ 10 AM or catch it On-Demand at www.afge.org/insidegovernment. From lobbyists to lawmakers and federal employees, Inside Government provides comprehensive coverage on the inner-workings of federal government. Hosted by J. Ward Morrow and Produced by Jason Fornicola.

Related News

EMERGING TECHNOLOGY

American Robotics is Approved by FAA to Run Automated Drones without Human Operators

American Robotics | January 19, 2021

American Robotics, a main engineer of completely robotized business drone frameworks, turned into the primary organization affirmed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to work computerized drones without human administrators on location. The organization's Scout System™ highlights progressed acoustic Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) innovation that empowers its drones to keep a protected separation from other airplane consistently. By building up a layered, repetitive arrangement of security that incorporates exclusive specialized and operational danger alleviations, American Robotics has demonstrated that its robot based ethereal insight stage works securely in the National Airspace System (NAS), in any event, when it conducts trips Beyond-Visual-Line-of-Sight (BVLOS) of the administrator. This endorsement speaks to a huge articulation point in the business drone industry. Earlier waivers and confirmations granted by the FAA required visual eyewitnesses (VOs) positioned along the flight way to keep eyes on the airspace consistently, or required other troublesome limitations, for example, foundation covering. Therefore, the worth and versatility of business drone use in the U.S. has, as of not long ago, been radically hindered or much of the time wiped out. “With these approvals, American Robotics is ushering in a new era of widespread automated drone operations,” said Reese Mozer, CEO and co-founder of American Robotics. “Decades worth of promise and projection are finally coming to fruition. We are proud to be the first company to meet the FAA’s comprehensive safety requirements, which had previously restricted the viability of drone use in the commercial sector. We are very grateful for the FAA’s willingness to work closely with American Robotics over the past four years on this precedent-setting authorization. With this set of approvals, American Robotics can begin safely operating our automated Scout platform for the benefit of the energy, infrastructure, agriculture, and security market verticals, helping unlock the projected $100 billion commercial drone market.”

Read More

U.S. Space Force Awards Geospark Analytics $100 Million Contract for SBIR technology Called Hyperion

Geospark Analytics | September 07, 2020

Geospark Analytics, the world class leader in developing applied artificial intelligence (AI) solutions for global threat and risk assessment, was just awarded a $95,000,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract with a five year ordering period for the Phase III commercialization of their Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) technology called Hyperion. The U.S. Air Force (USAF) originally awarded Geospark Analytics a $40,000 Phase I SBIR as part of their Pitch Day Event in 2019. Over the course of the next 18 months, Geospark Analytics delivered a series of Phase I, II and III enhancements to its Hyperion platform like collaboration and mobile features to the USAF, U.S. Combatant Commands and Federal Civilian Agencies. Now with this new enterprise-level contract Geospark Analytics will provide near real time situational awareness capabilities to the entire U.S. Federal Government by identifying and forecasting emerging events on a global scale to mitigate risk, recognize threats, greatly enhance indications and warnings and provide predictive analytics capabilities. Work will be performed in Herndon, VA, and is expected to be completed September 1, 2026.

Read More

White House to Rewrite Cloud Vendor Contracts for Security Liability

White House | May 21, 2020

The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past. The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors that would update liability terms regarding security, according to the official in charge of leading federal agencies’ move to the shared-responsibility ecosystems. “I think there is a need to update our [service level agreements] with the cloud providers and we're actively working on that within [the General Services Administration],” Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center and Cloud Optimization Infrastructure Program Management Office at GSA, said. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Read More: Trump Government Moves to Cut off Huawei from Global Chip Suppliers “OMB has just stood up a [program management office] to work on a cloud SLA template for the federal government to be attached to every contract,” Santucci said when asked about the liability issue and whether cloud service providers or government customers should be held responsible for security. Security was one of the topics mentioned in establishing the new contract templates, he said. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past, according to a program manager speaking from the “frontlines” of the cloud migration effort during the DGI conference. “The common themes that I heard were ‘I don’t understand security, I don’t want to have to deal with security by myself, and I’m also not a cloud expert,’” Joe Foster, cloud computing program manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said regarding his early days of trying to get agency components to move to the cloud. In some ways, the pandemic is taking the issue out of officials’ hands. Could anyone plan for what’s going on now? Probably not, but who could imagine let alone fund it? Referring to the pandemic. The situation does exactly that. Your users are now remote rather than in a central building or campus. Agencies that are doing well are mostly in the cloud with little or no impact. Remote users do not need a [virtual private network] to gain access to their emails or files, collaboration products have significantly reduced file duplicates, and bandwidth consumption is between the home internet connection and the cloud. It’s a great success story, Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center at GSA. Outside of no longer needing to run energy-intensive data centers, there are other, security-based reasons for moving to the cloud. Enabling security and development professionals to work in the same space has allowed for changes to applications to be pushed out faster, as Susie Adams, chief technology officer for Microsoft Federal, noted, for example. But as officials at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have stressed, moving to the cloud does not make security a “set it and forget it” feature. There are a lot of configurations and other considerations that customers may be responsible for under contracts. During an event hosted Tuesday by the Information Technology Industry Council, Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., also observed the pandemic causing a rush to the cloud but expressed more trepidation than exuberance. “This comes with an increased use of personal devices and cloud services, which may not be secure,” Matsui, co-chair of the House of Representatives’ High Tech Caucus, said. Matsui on Tuesday sent a letter to NIST Director Walter Copan asking that the agency work to establish metrics to accompany its landmark Cybersecurity Framework. The framework allows entities to select and implement security controls based on their individual subjective needs and risks. Matsui’s letter calls for a way to evaluate the security implications of those decisions. “As companies, nonprofits, and state and local governments work to quickly assess their cybersecurity strategies and evaluate measures to improve security during the pandemic, additional guidance from NIST could help speed the decision-making process and funnel resources to effective, proven methods,” she wrote. “With quantifiable measurement tools, cybersecurity strategies can be compared across industries and between entities. Metrics and measurements that facilitate comparisons and assess risk will be valuable for consumers, companies, and governments.” Read More: How to secure the U.S. government’s technology supply chain

Read More

Spotlight

Listen to AFGE's Inside Government on Federal News Radio, Friday @ 10 AM or catch it On-Demand at www.afge.org/insidegovernment. From lobbyists to lawmakers and federal employees, Inside Government provides comprehensive coverage on the inner-workings of federal government. Hosted by J. Ward Morrow and Produced by Jason Fornicola.