Government to clamp down on political advertising

RTÉ | November 05, 2019

Government to clamp down on political advertising
The Government is planning a new law to clamp down on paid-for political advertising on social media. The development follows significant concerns about the misuse of social media in recent foreign elections. There have also been issues about material from anonymous or hidden accounts which has been blamed for swaying debate in some electoral contests abroad. Political advertisements which are paid for on social media will now be required to be clearly labelled under new laws planned by the Government.

Spotlight

President Trump travels to Duluth, Minn., to join a roundtable discussion on Protecting American Workers. He said  about the discussion takes place just hours after President Trump signed an executive order ending the practice of family separation, which the administration had U.S. Customs and Border Patrol undertaking as part of the "zero-tolerance" policy and implemented in April, to prosecute all illegal border crossings.

Related News

The U.S. Department of Commerce to Allow U.S. Companies to Work with Huawei on 5G Technology

Huawei | May 07, 2020

The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks, people familiar with the matter said. Engineers in some U.S. technology companies stopped engaging with Huawei to develop standards after the Commerce Department blacklisted the company last year. The listing left companies uncertain about what technology and information their employees could share with Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker. That has put the United States at a disadvantage, said industry and government officials. In standards setting meetings, where protocols and technical specifications are developed that allow equipment from different companies to function together smoothly, Huawei gained a stronger voice as U.S. engineers sat back in silence. The Commerce Department placed Huawei on its “entity list” last May, citing national security concerns. The listing restricted sales of U.S. goods and technology to the company and raised questions about how U.S. firms could participate in organizations that establish industry standards. Read More: What Is 5G Technology, and What Does It Mean for Federal IT? After nearly a year of uncertainty, the department has drafted a new rule to address the issue, two sources told Reuters. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The draft is under final review at the Commerce Department and, if cleared, would go to other agencies for approval, the people said. It is unclear how long the full process will take or if another agency will object. As we approach the year mark, it is very much past time that this be addressed and clarified, which represents companies including Amazon.co Inc, Qualcomm Inc and Intel Corp. Naomi Wilson, senior director of policy for Asia. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. “But their policies have inadvertently caused U.S. companies to lose their seat at the table to Huawei and others on the entity list.” The rule is only expected to address Huawei, the people familiar with the matter said, not other listed entities like Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision. In adding Huawei to the list last May, the Commerce Department cited U.S. charges pending against the company for alleged violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran. It also noted that the indictment alleges Huawei engaged in “deceptive and obstructive acts” to evade U.S. law. Huawei has pleaded not guilty in the case. A Department of Commerce spokesman declined to comment. A Huawei spokeswoman also declined to comment. “I know that Commerce is working on that rule,” a senior State Department official told Reuters on Wednesday. “We are supportive in trying to find a solution to that conundrum.” The White House and departments of Defense, Energy, and Treasury did not immediately respond to requests for comment. “International standard setting is important to the development of 5G,” said another senior administration official, who also did not want to be identified. “The discussions are about balancing that consideration with America’s national security needs.” Six U.S. senators, including China hawks Marco Rubio, James Inhofe and Tom Cotton, last month sent a letter to the U.S. secretaries of Commerce, State, Defense and Energy about the urgent need to issue regulations confirming that U.S. participation in 5G standards-setting is not restricted by the entity listing. “We are deeply concerned about the risks to the U.S. global leadership position in 5G wireless technology as a result of this reduced participation,” the letter said. In the telecommunications industry, 5G, or fifth-generation wireless networks, are expected to power everything from high-speed video transmissions to self-driving cars. Industry standards also are big business for telecommunications firms. They vie to have their patented technology considered essential to the standard, which can boost a company’s bottom line by billions of dollars. The ITIC’s Wilson said the uncertainty has led U.S.-base standards bodies to consider moving abroad, noting that the nonprofit RISC-V Foundation (pronounced risk-five) decided to move from Delaware to Switzerland a few months ago. The foundation oversees promising semiconductor technology developed with Pentagon support and, as Reuters has reported, wants to ensure those outside the United States can help develop its open-source technology. Read More: 3 Things Government Can Learn About Cloud from the Private Sector About Huawei Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. With integrated solutions across four key domains – telecom networks, IT, smart devices, and cloud services – we are committed to bringing digital to every person, home and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world.

Read More

Google says government-backed hackers are weaponizing coronavirus for their attacks

Google | April 23, 2020

From hawking fake vaccines and stolen masks to phishing attempts designed to take advantage of the pandemic, the internet has seen coronavirus-related scams and attacks skyrocket over the past few weeks. Now, Google is sharing what its team of security experts have uncovered. Google’s Threat Analysis Group (TAG) released a report on Wednesday detailing a number of COVID-19 attacks seen across the company's product line. The search giant says it has specifically identified attacks targeting U.S. governmental workers and health agencies, phishing emails going after employees working from home, and fake charity solicitations.

Read More

FCC awarding up to $16 billion to address U.S. areas lacking broadband service

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission | June 09, 2020

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission voted on Tuesday to adopt auction procedures to provide up to $16 billion to areas that lack broadband service, including nearly 6 million unserved rural homes and businesses. The FCC voted to commence the auction on Oct. 29. Auction applicants will be required to offer voice and broadband services in unserved locations in exchange for receiving monthly payments over 10 years. The three FCC Republican commissioners approved the proposal, while the two Democrats dissented in part. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, a Republican, said Americans without access to high-speed internet “deserve access as soon as possible.

Read More

Spotlight

President Trump travels to Duluth, Minn., to join a roundtable discussion on Protecting American Workers. He said  about the discussion takes place just hours after President Trump signed an executive order ending the practice of family separation, which the administration had U.S. Customs and Border Patrol undertaking as part of the "zero-tolerance" policy and implemented in April, to prosecute all illegal border crossings.