Mexico may be an unexpected winner of the US-China trade war

CNBC | September 12, 2019

Mexico may be an unexpected winner of the US-China trade war
China and the United States are disrupting trade in much of the world with their trade war — but Mexico may be a winner. Despite fresh hopes among investors for a peaceful conclusion, the trade conflict that began between the world’s two biggest economies more than a year ago shows no substantive signs of ending. But amid all the chaos, Mexico is coming out on top, said John Murphy, senior vice president for international policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Mexico, he said, has been able to build on its emergence as a manufacturing hub “with free-trade agreements that offer guaranteed access to more than 50 foreign countries.”

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States today struggle to fund health services for all their programs, including Medicaid, state employees, prisons, state university systems, and others. The rising cost of prescription drugs is a key factor in this struggle an estimated 25 percent of state budgets go to fund Medicaid, and state spending on Medicaid drugs alone increased 25 percent in 2014 and 14 percent in 2015. States operate in highly constrained budget environments, which require new and creative approaches to manage rapidly rising health care spending.

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The U.S. Department of Commerce to Allow U.S. Companies to Work with Huawei on 5G Technology

Huawei | May 07, 2020

The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks, people familiar with the matter said. Engineers in some U.S. technology companies stopped engaging with Huawei to develop standards after the Commerce Department blacklisted the company last year. The listing left companies uncertain about what technology and information their employees could share with Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker. That has put the United States at a disadvantage, said industry and government officials. In standards setting meetings, where protocols and technical specifications are developed that allow equipment from different companies to function together smoothly, Huawei gained a stronger voice as U.S. engineers sat back in silence. The Commerce Department placed Huawei on its “entity list” last May, citing national security concerns. The listing restricted sales of U.S. goods and technology to the company and raised questions about how U.S. firms could participate in organizations that establish industry standards. Read More: What Is 5G Technology, and What Does It Mean for Federal IT? After nearly a year of uncertainty, the department has drafted a new rule to address the issue, two sources told Reuters. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The draft is under final review at the Commerce Department and, if cleared, would go to other agencies for approval, the people said. It is unclear how long the full process will take or if another agency will object. As we approach the year mark, it is very much past time that this be addressed and clarified, which represents companies including Amazon.co Inc, Qualcomm Inc and Intel Corp. Naomi Wilson, senior director of policy for Asia. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. “But their policies have inadvertently caused U.S. companies to lose their seat at the table to Huawei and others on the entity list.” The rule is only expected to address Huawei, the people familiar with the matter said, not other listed entities like Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision. In adding Huawei to the list last May, the Commerce Department cited U.S. charges pending against the company for alleged violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran. It also noted that the indictment alleges Huawei engaged in “deceptive and obstructive acts” to evade U.S. law. Huawei has pleaded not guilty in the case. A Department of Commerce spokesman declined to comment. A Huawei spokeswoman also declined to comment. “I know that Commerce is working on that rule,” a senior State Department official told Reuters on Wednesday. “We are supportive in trying to find a solution to that conundrum.” The White House and departments of Defense, Energy, and Treasury did not immediately respond to requests for comment. “International standard setting is important to the development of 5G,” said another senior administration official, who also did not want to be identified. “The discussions are about balancing that consideration with America’s national security needs.” Six U.S. senators, including China hawks Marco Rubio, James Inhofe and Tom Cotton, last month sent a letter to the U.S. secretaries of Commerce, State, Defense and Energy about the urgent need to issue regulations confirming that U.S. participation in 5G standards-setting is not restricted by the entity listing. “We are deeply concerned about the risks to the U.S. global leadership position in 5G wireless technology as a result of this reduced participation,” the letter said. In the telecommunications industry, 5G, or fifth-generation wireless networks, are expected to power everything from high-speed video transmissions to self-driving cars. Industry standards also are big business for telecommunications firms. They vie to have their patented technology considered essential to the standard, which can boost a company’s bottom line by billions of dollars. The ITIC’s Wilson said the uncertainty has led U.S.-base standards bodies to consider moving abroad, noting that the nonprofit RISC-V Foundation (pronounced risk-five) decided to move from Delaware to Switzerland a few months ago. The foundation oversees promising semiconductor technology developed with Pentagon support and, as Reuters has reported, wants to ensure those outside the United States can help develop its open-source technology. Read More: 3 Things Government Can Learn About Cloud from the Private Sector About Huawei Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. With integrated solutions across four key domains – telecom networks, IT, smart devices, and cloud services – we are committed to bringing digital to every person, home and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world.

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GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Corelight Named to U.S. Department of Defense Enterprise Software Initiative

Corelight | August 31, 2021

Corelight, provider of the industry's leading open network detection and response (NDR) platform, today announced that it has been named a vendor on the Department of Defense (DoD) Enterprise Software Initiative (ESI) blanket purchase agreement (BPA) awarded to Carahsoft Technology Corp., The Trusted Government IT Solutions Provider®. The BPA is signed for a 10-year period of performance through July 2029. Under the agreement, Carahsoft will provide asset management and cybersecurity software, software maintenance support, information technology professional services and training from Corelight to the DoD, U.S. intelligence community and Coast Guard. "Solidifying a true private/public partnership is essential to strengthening the nation's cybersecurity posture," said Jean Schaffer, federal CTO at Corelight. "Our data-first approach to cybersecurity aligns to the DoD's mission as federal agencies advance their digital transformation journeys and modernize infrastructure. We are proud to support this effort." Corelight gives federal, state and local governments the advantage in network defense. Corelight's open network detection and response (NDR) platform delivers insights that protect citizens and data from cyberattacks. This BPA supports the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act and Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement and is intended to reduce the contracting and open market costs associated with the traditional procurement process, including searching for sources, developing technical documents and solicitations, negotiating contractual terms, and evaluating offers. Corelight's software solutions are available under Blanket Purchase Agreement N66001-21-A-0031 through Carahsoft's GSA Schedule No. GS-35F-0119Y. For procurement information, contact the Carahsoft IT Asset Management BPA Team at (703) 889-9878 or ITAMBPA@Carahsoft.com. About the DoD Enterprise Software Initiative (DoD ESI) DoD ESI is an official DoD initiative sponsored by the DoD Chief Information Officer (CIO) to lead in the establishment and management of enterprise COTS IT agreements, assets, and policies. DoD ESI lowers the total cost of ownership across the DoD, Coast Guard and Intelligence Communities for commercial software, IT hardware, and services. Additional information about the DoD ESI can be found at www.esi.mil. About Corelight Corelight provides security teams with network evidence so they can protect the world's most critical organizations and companies. Corelight's global customers include Fortune 500 companies, major government agencies, and large research universities. The company has received investment support from Accel, General Catalyst, Insight Partners and Osage University Partners. Based in San Francisco, Corelight is an open-core security company founded by the creators of Zeek, the widely-used network security technology.

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GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Fluree’s Data-Centric Architecture Drives Transformation for Top Governmental Entities, Amidst Backdrop of Data Decrees

Fluree | August 28, 2021

Fluree, a market leader in secure data management, has been actively working with the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Department of Education as public sector entities issue data decrees amidst a broad move towards data sharing and growing concerns over cyberattacks. Collaborative efforts ensure data integrity and secure data sharing, which can prevent future cyberattacks via Fluree’s cryptographically secured data-centric architecture. This comes amidst the backdrop of recent data decrees issued by the DOD calling for more secure and interoperable data management practices. The Biden administration has also issued an executive order on improving the nation’s security. “Fluree is able to provide the glue for secure data-sharing. This is becoming increasingly important as cyberattacks against public and private sector entities have become more prominent and cataclysmic, inciting the issuance of recent data decrees,” Fluree Co-founder and CEO Brian Platz said. “Our data-centric architecture stack fulfills the DOD’s data decrees by maximizing data sharing and rights for data use and allowing for open and secure data sharing across multiple parties.” Fluree’s practice of storing and executing data security at the data layer—rather than deferring permission logic to APIs and application servers—effectively allows data to defend itself under a set of enforceable conditions. To date, Fluree, an immutable graph database with cloud-native architecture, has been applied in a handful of recent government projects, including: The DOD and U.S. Air Force, through the AFWERX SBIR program, have contracted Fluree to build a secure data-sharing platform. The Department of Education, through the American Council on Education's Blockchain Innovation challenge, has funded UnBlockEd. This is a collaborative effort from Fluree, the Gardner Institute, University of Arizona and Georgia Tech. UnBlockEd uses blockchain technology to build verifiable learner credentials for easier transfer credit articulation. The Department of Education has also funded the Lifelong Learner Project. Using blockchain technology, the Lifelong Learner Project is a collaboration of teacher-centered organizations focused on teacher licensure and professional learning. Fluree sits at the center of the data ecosystems of tomorrow. It extends the role of the database or data lake to include provenance, interoperability, governance/security and scalability. As the demand for secure, interoperable data ecosystems gains momentum, Fluree is becoming a prominent leader in the public sector data management space. About Fluree, PBC Founded in 2016 by Brian Platz and Flip Filipowski, Fluree PBC is a Public Benefit Corporation headquartered in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Fluree is an enterprise data management platform that guarantees data integrity, facilitates secure data sharing, and powers data-driven insights. The Fluree platform organizes blockchain-secured data in a scalable semantic graph database—establishing a foundational layer of trusted data for connected and intelligent data ecosystems.

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Spotlight

States today struggle to fund health services for all their programs, including Medicaid, state employees, prisons, state university systems, and others. The rising cost of prescription drugs is a key factor in this struggle an estimated 25 percent of state budgets go to fund Medicaid, and state spending on Medicaid drugs alone increased 25 percent in 2014 and 14 percent in 2015. States operate in highly constrained budget environments, which require new and creative approaches to manage rapidly rising health care spending.