National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence Emphasizes on High Tech Employees in Government

The National Security Commission | July 27, 2020

National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence Emphasizes on High Tech Employees in Government
Zooming out from its scope of national security and artificial intelligence, a federal advisory commission is looking at how to funnel an array of technical talent to the federal government in droves. In its latest round of recommendations to Congress formalized July 21, the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence suggests ways to get high-tech employees trained and then locked into federal service commitments—ideas modeled after the military service academies and ROTC programs. No matter how the proposals evolve with more study, “We all believe that there is a vast shortage of the talent in the government needed to prosecute AI and national security,” said Eric Schmidt, chair of the commission and a past top executive at Google, including a decade as CEO. During a July 22 call with reporters, Schmidt said the commission will relook at a part of its recommendation for a new degree-granting service academy within the federal government, which currently doesn’t allow for graduates to fulfill their federal service requirement in uniform.

Spotlight

Senior Research Fellow Patrick McLaughlin demonstrates the growth of federal regulation in the United States since 1950 by stacking books from the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).  The red and black colors do not signify anything relevant to this demonstration. The federal government releases partial updates to the CFR on a quarterly basis and changes the color from one year to the next.

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Spotlight

Senior Research Fellow Patrick McLaughlin demonstrates the growth of federal regulation in the United States since 1950 by stacking books from the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).  The red and black colors do not signify anything relevant to this demonstration. The federal government releases partial updates to the CFR on a quarterly basis and changes the color from one year to the next.