Pete Buttigieg: white supremacy could be the end of America

The Guardian | July 21, 2019

Pete Buttigieg: white supremacy could be the end of America
White supremacy “could be the lurking issue that ends this country”, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has said, adding: “The entire American experiment is at stake.” The mayor of South Bend, Indiana made the stark comments to ABC News, in the midst of boiling national controversy over Donald Trump’s racist remarks about four Democratic congresswomen. “That is the only issue that almost ended this country,” Buttigieg said. “We’ve had a lot challenges in this country, but the one that actually almost ended this country in the civil war was white supremacy.

Spotlight

Federal workers place tremendous value on in-person meetings, conferences, and events – whether they involve sitting around a table in Washington, D.C., travelling to a national research symposium, or actively participating in an education and training session. Face-to-face interaction is critical for creating personal connections and driving positive business outcomes. It yields higher levels of engagement, creates a shared sense of purpose, and develops the type of camaraderie that positions a government agency for success.

Spotlight

Federal workers place tremendous value on in-person meetings, conferences, and events – whether they involve sitting around a table in Washington, D.C., travelling to a national research symposium, or actively participating in an education and training session. Face-to-face interaction is critical for creating personal connections and driving positive business outcomes. It yields higher levels of engagement, creates a shared sense of purpose, and develops the type of camaraderie that positions a government agency for success.

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