GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

SAIC to Display its Leading Training and Simulation Solutions to Help Government During COVID-19 Pandemic

SAIC | December 02, 2020

SAIC to Display its Leading Training and Simulation Solutions to Help Government During COVID-19 Pandemic
Science Applications International Corp. will show its driving preparing and reenactment arrangements, including an engineered experiential set-up of programming, adaptable intuitive models with procedural guidance, and another microlearning stage brought in-SITE, during the 2020 Interservice/Industry Training, Simulation and Education Conference (I/ITSEC), the world's biggest demonstrating, reproduction and preparing occasion. SAIC's answers carry creative preparing innovation to help secure America's warfighters and modernize the U.S. government, in any event, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“SAIC has a long history of delivering leading agile, integrated training solutions to prepare our customers for any situation, ensuring optimal performance,” said Bob Kleinhample, SAIC training and mission solutions vice president and I/ITSEC 2020 conference chair. “Our solutions use modern technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning, cloud, 3D printing, and more to bring the latest innovations to federal government agencies. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we have tailored these solutions to respond to our customers’ unique remote training challenges with great success.”

As conference seat, Kleinhample will likewise convey comments during the initial services on innovation patterns to be seen at I/ITSEC.

Since 2018, SAIC has worked with the U.S. Flying corps to reform the manner in which it trains pilots by sending business off–the-rack (COTS) test systems and computer generated reality to graduate more pilots every year. As a component of the Pilot Training Next program, understudies use work area size test systems for simple admittance to a vivid reenactment climate, engaging them to direct preparing on their own timetables. Subsequently, pilots are prepared for live guidance in about a fraction of the time.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, numerous pilots needed to self-isolate and social distance to guarantee their security, yet the basic requirement for pilot preparing has remained. SAIC's group immediately rotated and amassed an answer in pilots' apartments to guarantee they complete their required flight-time preparing. At present, notwithstanding the pandemic interruption, students finished 96% of their arranged learning and trips through the pandemic.

Moreover, SAIC has finished preparing for in excess of 1,000 U.S. Armed force National Guard military insight sentries during the pandemic to help them with required preparing and to guarantee they hold similar norms as their deployment ready partners. Utilizing SAIC's Military Intelligence (MI) Gym, SAIC's plan tends to the National Guard's difficulties by furnishing preparing anyplace and whenever with cross usefulness, flexibility, and moderateness. Despite the fact that watchmen couldn't gather for drill obligation because of the pandemic, almost 1,000 enrolled sentries finished preparing distantly utilizing MI Gym.

Furthermore, during the conference, SAIC CEO Nazzic Keene will convey a feature discourse on Monday, Nov. 30, during the show's initial functions, following a presentation by Kleinhample. Kleinhample and Keene will examine innovation patterns visible at I/ITSEC, and Keene will likewise talk about the effects of COVID-19 and future preparing on virtual preparing and reproduction.

About SAIC

SAIC® is a premier Fortune 500® technology integrator driving our nation’s digital transformation. Our robust portfolio of offerings across the defense, space, civilian, and intelligence markets includes secure high-end solutions in engineering, IT modernization, and mission solutions. Using our expertise and understanding of existing and emerging technologies, we integrate the best components from our own portfolio and our partner ecosystem to deliver innovative, effective, and efficient solutions that are critical to achieving our customers' missions.

Spotlight

Accenture research evaluated the current implementation levels of digital services, the overall service delivery experience and citizens’ satisfaction levels across 10 countries—Brazil, Germany, India, Norway, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US).

Spotlight

Accenture research evaluated the current implementation levels of digital services, the overall service delivery experience and citizens’ satisfaction levels across 10 countries—Brazil, Germany, India, Norway, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the United Kingdom (UK) and the United States (US).

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