Trump administration says Obamacare plan premiums to fall

Reuters | October 22, 2019

Trump administration says Obamacare plan premiums to fall
Monthly premiums for an average 2020 Obamacare health insurance plan will fall about 4 percent from this year, according to a report released Tuesday by the Trump administration, which has tried to dismantle the program. The Trump administration has cut back on funding for the health insurance program, which was created by President Barack Obama as part of the Affordable Care Act and is often called Obamacare, and has sought to overturn it in Congress and legal courts. Obamacare provides needs-based subsidies to help low-income people buy health insurance.

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White House to Rewrite Cloud Vendor Contracts for Security Liability

White House | May 21, 2020

The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past. The Office of Management and Budget plans to standardize language in all government contracts with cloud vendors that would update liability terms regarding security, according to the official in charge of leading federal agencies’ move to the shared-responsibility ecosystems. “I think there is a need to update our [service level agreements] with the cloud providers and we're actively working on that within [the General Services Administration],” Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center and Cloud Optimization Infrastructure Program Management Office at GSA, said. Santucci provided a status report on the government’s efforts to improve efficiency and lower costs by moving to the cloud during a virtual conference the Digital Government Institute hosted today. Read More: Trump Government Moves to Cut off Huawei from Global Chip Suppliers “OMB has just stood up a [program management office] to work on a cloud SLA template for the federal government to be attached to every contract,” Santucci said when asked about the liability issue and whether cloud service providers or government customers should be held responsible for security. Security was one of the topics mentioned in establishing the new contract templates, he said. Technology vendors precluding liability in government contracts has long been an issue, and it could be one reason some in government agencies have been timid about moving to the cloud in the past, according to a program manager speaking from the “frontlines” of the cloud migration effort during the DGI conference. “The common themes that I heard were ‘I don’t understand security, I don’t want to have to deal with security by myself, and I’m also not a cloud expert,’” Joe Foster, cloud computing program manager at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said regarding his early days of trying to get agency components to move to the cloud. In some ways, the pandemic is taking the issue out of officials’ hands. Could anyone plan for what’s going on now? Probably not, but who could imagine let alone fund it? Referring to the pandemic. The situation does exactly that. Your users are now remote rather than in a central building or campus. Agencies that are doing well are mostly in the cloud with little or no impact. Remote users do not need a [virtual private network] to gain access to their emails or files, collaboration products have significantly reduced file duplicates, and bandwidth consumption is between the home internet connection and the cloud. It’s a great success story, Thomas Santucci, the director of the Data Center at GSA. Outside of no longer needing to run energy-intensive data centers, there are other, security-based reasons for moving to the cloud. Enabling security and development professionals to work in the same space has allowed for changes to applications to be pushed out faster, as Susie Adams, chief technology officer for Microsoft Federal, noted, for example. But as officials at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have stressed, moving to the cloud does not make security a “set it and forget it” feature. There are a lot of configurations and other considerations that customers may be responsible for under contracts. During an event hosted Tuesday by the Information Technology Industry Council, Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., also observed the pandemic causing a rush to the cloud but expressed more trepidation than exuberance. “This comes with an increased use of personal devices and cloud services, which may not be secure,” Matsui, co-chair of the House of Representatives’ High Tech Caucus, said. Matsui on Tuesday sent a letter to NIST Director Walter Copan asking that the agency work to establish metrics to accompany its landmark Cybersecurity Framework. The framework allows entities to select and implement security controls based on their individual subjective needs and risks. Matsui’s letter calls for a way to evaluate the security implications of those decisions. “As companies, nonprofits, and state and local governments work to quickly assess their cybersecurity strategies and evaluate measures to improve security during the pandemic, additional guidance from NIST could help speed the decision-making process and funnel resources to effective, proven methods,” she wrote. “With quantifiable measurement tools, cybersecurity strategies can be compared across industries and between entities. Metrics and measurements that facilitate comparisons and assess risk will be valuable for consumers, companies, and governments.” Read More: How to secure the U.S. government’s technology supply chain

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Inpixon Secures Purchase Order for Hundreds of High-End, Next-Generation, Multi-Tech RF Sensors for U.S. Federal Government

Inpixon | August 27, 2021

Inpixon (Nasdaq: INPX), the Indoor Intelligence™ company, today announced it has received a purchase order for hundreds of high-end, next-generation, multi-tech radio frequency (RF) sensors for a U.S. federal government customer. Inpixon multi-tech RF sensors detect and locate active Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, cellular and UWB wireless transmissions emanating from phones, smartwatches, tablets, computers, access points, IoT devices and more. Inpixon security solutions are designed to help corporate enterprises and governmental agencies combat theft of confidential information while enhancing safety and operational efficiency by providing visibility into the location of visitors, wireless devices, key personnel and critical assets within a facility. Inpixon security solutions have earned multiple industry honors including the Security Excellence Award and the IoT Sensor Company of the Year Award. Soumya Das, COO of Inpixon, stated, "Our newest generation of multi-tech sensors demonstrate our continuing commitment to providing customers with comprehensive security solutions that assist organizations in creating a smarter, safer and more secure environment for personnel, visitors and assets. We are pleased to receive this purchase order from a U.S. federal government customer and believe this is further evidence of the continued recognition of the value of our solutions. We expect additional, significant high-margin orders in the months and years ahead from security-sensitive governmental and private facilities to address their growing physical and cybersecurity threats." About Inpixon Inpixon® (Nasdaq: INPX) is the innovator of Indoor Intelligence™, delivering actionable insights for people, places and things. Combining the power of mapping, positioning and analytics, Inpixon helps to create smarter, safer, and more secure environments. The company's Indoor Intelligence and mobile app solutions are leveraged by a multitude of industries to optimize operations, increase productivity, and enhance safety. Inpixon customers can take advantage of industry leading location awareness, RTLS, workplace and hybrid event solutions, analytics, sensor fusion and the IoT to create exceptional experiences and to do good with indoor data.

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CellTrust SL2 Now Available in Azure Government with a Dedicated Instance

CellTrust Corporation | October 07, 2020

CellTrust Corporation, a leading provider of global secure and compliant mobile communication for government and enterprise, announced today that its flagship SL2™ mobile app is also now available with Microsoft Azure Government, featuring a dedicated instance to meet the highest level of government compliance. CellTrust SL2 is an enterprise-level application that works by assigning a dedicated Mobile Business Number™ (MBN) to personal and corporate-owned mobile devices to keep personal and business communications separate on a single device. The seamless solution enables compliant, secure SMS messages and business calls on the device without using the personal number. This capability is vital for government agencies and their partners that require greater security for mobile communications, as well as archiving for e-discovery and compliance, such as FOIA, HIPAA, FINRA, SEC, sunshine laws, and public records laws.

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Spotlight

In 2015, GAO introduced a rating system for tracking progress in High Risk areas. See how GAO depicts each area’s rating with its five-pointed star tool.