Trump’s plan to bypass Congress on trade with Japan

Politico | April 02, 2019

Trump’s plan to bypass Congress on trade with Japan
The Japanese space agency recently landed a spacecraft on a miniscule asteroid traveling nearly 14,000 miles per hour relative to Earth. Many observers have concluded that it will take a similar feat to land the U.S.-Japan trade agreement negotiations expected to kick off in the next several weeks. Congress and the private sector have been pushing for a traditional, comprehensive agreement covering all trade topics. Skeptics note that such a comprehensive agreement would involve tough issues like currency manipulation that could make for a drawn-out and difficult landing, and any such deal would need congressional approval to take effect. But what if the Trump administration has in mind a staged approach that would avoid the need for congressional approval in the first stage? There are growing signs that the administration might be considering this approach as a way to address its most pressing political need assuaging President Donald Trump’s agricultural base, which has been buffeted by retaliation for Trump’s metals and China tariffs and by lost opportunities due to his withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership.

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Over the next five years, as Earth Day moves closer to its 50th anniversary, we’re calling on you to help us achieve one of our most ambitious goals yet —we’re planting 7.8 billion trees and we’re starting now. Trees will be the first of five major goals we are undertaking in honor of the five-year countdown to our 50th anniversary.

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GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

Parsons Continues Software Development Leadership with USAF Award

Parsons Corporation | December 17, 2020

Parsons Corporation (NYSE: PSN) has been awarded another, competitive assignment request worth roughly $20 million under the organization's Global Application Research, Development, Engineering, and Maintenance (GARDEM) inconclusive conveyance/uncertain amount (IDIQ) contract with the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The three-year agreement will uphold operationally engaged innovative work exercises for the U.S. Aviation based armed forces, Department of Defense, and Intelligence Community. This undertaking request is the fourth competitive offer Parsons has won on the GARDEM contract since 2019, adding up to $154 million. "We're excited to continue partnering with the AFRL on discovering, developing and delivering innovative warfighting technologies that empower operations across the all-domain battlespace," said Hector Cuevas, executive vice president and general manager of Parsons' missile defense and C5ISR market. "Parsons' 20-year history of developing integrated, rapid, mission-ready software tools will provide fast, tailorable solutions to the end-user regardless of mission location." Parsons will get equipment and programming, perform scientific examinations, framework practicality considers, framework plan, quick prototyping, programming improvement, and utilitarian test and assessment investigations. The organization's spry mentality, tradition of execution, and operational experience creating adaptable, tough programming frameworks will supplement AFRL's current programming and take into account resulting reuse and development. About Parsons Corporation Parsons (NYSE: PSN) is a leading disruptive technology provider in the global defense, intelligence, and critical infrastructure markets, with capabilities across cybersecurity, missile defense, space, connected infrastructure, and smart cities.

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The U.S. Department of Commerce to Allow U.S. Companies to Work with Huawei on 5G Technology

Huawei | May 07, 2020

The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The U.S. Department of Commerce is close to signing off on a new rule that would allow U.S. companies to work with China’s Huawei Technologies on setting standards for next generation 5G networks, people familiar with the matter said. Engineers in some U.S. technology companies stopped engaging with Huawei to develop standards after the Commerce Department blacklisted the company last year. The listing left companies uncertain about what technology and information their employees could share with Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker. That has put the United States at a disadvantage, said industry and government officials. In standards setting meetings, where protocols and technical specifications are developed that allow equipment from different companies to function together smoothly, Huawei gained a stronger voice as U.S. engineers sat back in silence. The Commerce Department placed Huawei on its “entity list” last May, citing national security concerns. The listing restricted sales of U.S. goods and technology to the company and raised questions about how U.S. firms could participate in organizations that establish industry standards. Read More: What Is 5G Technology, and What Does It Mean for Federal IT? After nearly a year of uncertainty, the department has drafted a new rule to address the issue, two sources told Reuters. The rule, which could still change, essentially allows U.S. companies to participate in standards bodies where Huawei is also a member, the sources said. The draft is under final review at the Commerce Department and, if cleared, would go to other agencies for approval, the people said. It is unclear how long the full process will take or if another agency will object. As we approach the year mark, it is very much past time that this be addressed and clarified, which represents companies including Amazon.co Inc, Qualcomm Inc and Intel Corp. Naomi Wilson, senior director of policy for Asia. The U.S. government wants U.S. companies to remain competitive with Huawei, Wilson said. “But their policies have inadvertently caused U.S. companies to lose their seat at the table to Huawei and others on the entity list.” The rule is only expected to address Huawei, the people familiar with the matter said, not other listed entities like Chinese video surveillance firm Hikvision. In adding Huawei to the list last May, the Commerce Department cited U.S. charges pending against the company for alleged violations of U.S. sanctions against Iran. It also noted that the indictment alleges Huawei engaged in “deceptive and obstructive acts” to evade U.S. law. Huawei has pleaded not guilty in the case. A Department of Commerce spokesman declined to comment. A Huawei spokeswoman also declined to comment. “I know that Commerce is working on that rule,” a senior State Department official told Reuters on Wednesday. “We are supportive in trying to find a solution to that conundrum.” The White House and departments of Defense, Energy, and Treasury did not immediately respond to requests for comment. “International standard setting is important to the development of 5G,” said another senior administration official, who also did not want to be identified. “The discussions are about balancing that consideration with America’s national security needs.” Six U.S. senators, including China hawks Marco Rubio, James Inhofe and Tom Cotton, last month sent a letter to the U.S. secretaries of Commerce, State, Defense and Energy about the urgent need to issue regulations confirming that U.S. participation in 5G standards-setting is not restricted by the entity listing. “We are deeply concerned about the risks to the U.S. global leadership position in 5G wireless technology as a result of this reduced participation,” the letter said. In the telecommunications industry, 5G, or fifth-generation wireless networks, are expected to power everything from high-speed video transmissions to self-driving cars. Industry standards also are big business for telecommunications firms. They vie to have their patented technology considered essential to the standard, which can boost a company’s bottom line by billions of dollars. The ITIC’s Wilson said the uncertainty has led U.S.-base standards bodies to consider moving abroad, noting that the nonprofit RISC-V Foundation (pronounced risk-five) decided to move from Delaware to Switzerland a few months ago. The foundation oversees promising semiconductor technology developed with Pentagon support and, as Reuters has reported, wants to ensure those outside the United States can help develop its open-source technology. Read More: 3 Things Government Can Learn About Cloud from the Private Sector About Huawei Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. With integrated solutions across four key domains – telecom networks, IT, smart devices, and cloud services – we are committed to bringing digital to every person, home and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world.

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GOVERNMENT BUSINESS

CTI launches software integration and training services for government platforms

CTI | August 18, 2021

CTI, a leading government software and systems development company, is launching its new Training and Integration Services program. CTI now offers customized Team Awareness Kit/Tactical Assault Kit (TAK) and RaptorX training to improve and maintain TAK user proficiencies and provide custom integrations for third-party platforms requiring component integrations with TAK, Raptor, and Electronic Warfare Planning and Management Tool (EWPMT) government platforms. Training Services CTI's Training Service will leverage the team's combined experience within Special Operations and Electromagnetic Spectrum Operations to provide hands-on instruction of TAK and RaptorX to the end-user, maximizing mission success in the field. CTI trainers rapidly develop customized curriculums to meet mission requirements and conduct instruction both in classroom and field training venues to support the needs of the user community. John Goodson, a Naval Special Warfare veteran and CTI's Director of Products, elaborates further on the need, "Every unit has several power users that maintain TAK proficiency across the team, but as the those individuals naturally transition into new roles, that knowledge leaves the organization, impacting mission readiness. The training services provided by our team of ex-military TAK and RaptorX subject matter experts fills that gap by expanding the team's knowledge and ensuring that it is consistently maintained regardless of personnel turnover." Integration Services With over 20 years of developing open, government-owned platforms, CTI is expanding its expertise to third-party partners that require integration of their unique technologies into government-open platforms. Offering this turnkey integration service enables our partners to focus on their technology value, leveraging CTI's experience navigating platform intricacies, government approval processes, and ensuring testing and validation is complete prior to new versions being released. "From adding complex Electronic Warfare (EW) sensors into TAK within days at training exercises to full systems integration considering networks, protocols, sensors, emerging cloud infrastructure, and operational concerns informed by our veterans -- CTI is the impartial glue that makes things work smoothly for our Warfighters," says CTI's Product Solution Architect, Steven Turner. No matter how difficult the integration, CTI is ready to bring our experience to reduce developer and user frustration, ensuring the adoption of technologies into government applications across all warfighting domains and commercial markets that may benefit from open, government-owned applications. About CTI's Solutions and Services CTI's solutions are the preferred standard in the mission space due to the team's iterative, hand-on development with users, unique application of agile methodologies, and utility-driven design. CTI is focused on building solutions on open-source and open government-owned platforms. This corporate philosophy ensures that industry proprietary software or hardware tools do not stand in the way of the right capabilities being brought to bear in the field. Paired with our "Rapid" approach to solutions development, service delivery, and business execution, CTI continues to thrive in the defense marketplace. CTI is headquartered in California, MD and has offices in San Diego, Camarillo, and Santa Barbara, CA as well as Denver, CO, Honolulu, HI, and Chantilly, VA.

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Spotlight

Over the next five years, as Earth Day moves closer to its 50th anniversary, we’re calling on you to help us achieve one of our most ambitious goals yet —we’re planting 7.8 billion trees and we’re starting now. Trees will be the first of five major goals we are undertaking in honor of the five-year countdown to our 50th anniversary.