UK Government accused of abandoning Scottish farmers over Brexit

Aberdeen Journals Ltd | February 12, 2019

UK Government accused of abandoning Scottish farmers over Brexit
The UK Government has been accused of abandoning Scottish farmers over Brexit after the EU offered extra support for Irish agriculture if there’s no deal. The accusation was made by SNP Rural Affairs spokeswoman Deidre Brock after EC President Jean Claude Junker promised last week that the EU would give Irish farmers extra cash if the UK crashed out of the bloc. Ms Brock said: “The EU will support Irish farmers to avoid the worst effects of a no-deal Brexit and there is nothing similar being offered to Scottish farmers by the UK government.

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Trump Government Moves to Cut off Huawei from Global Chip Suppliers

Huawei | May 19, 2020

U.S. Department of Commerce announced plans to restrict Chinese vendor Huawei’s ability to use U.S. chipmaking equipment and software to design and manufacture its semiconductors abroad. The U.S. government believes that Huawei has continued to use U.S. software and technology to design semiconductors. Huawei is undertaking a comprehensive examination of this new rule. We expect that our business will inevitably be affected. We will try all we can to seek a solution. The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) of the U.S. Department of Commerce announced plans to restrict Chinese vendor Huawei’s ability to use U.S. chipmaking equipment and software to design and manufacture its semiconductors abroad. In a statement, BIS said that the move “cuts off Huawei’s efforts to undermine U.S. export controls,” and that the government agency is amending its longstanding foreign-produced direct product rule and the Entity List to “narrowly and strategically target Huawei’s acquisition of semiconductors that are the direct product of certain U.S. software and technology.” Huawei was added to the Entity List in May 2019, after the Department of Commerce concluded that the vendor was engaged in activities that were contrary to U.S. national security or foreign policy interests. Read More: Isotropic Systems Announces Antenna Evaluation and Development Contract with U.S. Defense Innovation Unit However, the U.S. government believes that Huawei has continued to use U.S. software and technology to design semiconductors and says that the company is therefore “undermining the national security and foreign policy purposes of the Entity List by commissioning their production in overseas foundries using U.S. equipment.” Despite the Entity List actions the Department took last year, Huawei and its foreign affiliates have stepped-up efforts to undermine these national security-based restrictions through an indigenization effort. However, that effort is still dependent on U.S. technologies. We must amend our rules exploited by Huawei and HiSilicon and prevent U.S. technologies from enabling malign activities contrary to U.S. national security and foreign policy interests, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. Under the new regulation, companies using U.S. chipmaking technology — including foreign chipmakers –will be required to obtain a license before supplying components to Huawei. BIS also said that a waiver will be granted for items already in production as of May 15, provided that they are shipped within 120 days. However, as CNBC reported, there is no indication that BIS will actually provide such licenses, and the new rules will have a huge impact on Huawei due to its heavy reliance on Taiwan’s TSMC, which uses American equipment to manufacture the majority of Huawei’s smartphone chips. “This decision by the U.S. government does not just affect Huawei. It will have a serious impact on a wide number of global industries. In the long run, this will damage the trust and collaboration within the global semiconductor industry which many industries depend on, increasing conflict and loss within these industries,” Huawei said in a statement. “Huawei is undertaking a comprehensive examination of this new rule. We expect that our business will inevitably be affected. We will try all we can to seek a solution. We hope that our customers and suppliers will continue to stand with us and minimize the impact of this discriminatory rule,” Huawei added. Also, the Department of Commerce announced that it will extend the Temporary General License (TGL) for Huawei and its non-U.S. affiliates which are subject to the Entity List, until August 13. The TGL authorizes U.S. companies to make specific, limited engagements in transactions involving the export, reexport, and transfer of items to the Chinese vendor. The initial TGL was granted in May 19, 2019 and had been extended several times since then. “The 90-day extension provides an opportunity for users of Huawei devices and telecommunication providers—particularly those in rural U.S. communities—to continue to temporarily operate such devices and existing networks while hastening the transition to alternative suppliers,” DoC said. “The Department is also notifying the public that activities authorized in the TGL may be revised and possibly eliminated after August 13, 2020. Companies and persons relying on TGL authorizations should begin preparations to determine the specific, quantifiable impact of elimination if they have not done so already.” Outside of the scope of the TGL, any exports, reexports, or in-country transfers of items subject to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) will continue to require a license, if granted, after a review by BIS under a presumption of denial, the Department of Commerce said. However, this general license does not cover transactions between U.S. semiconductor manufacturers such as Qualcomm, Intel and Micron and Huawei. These companies are required to apply for special permits in order to continue supplying chips to the Chinese vendor. Read More: The U.S. Department of Commerce to Allow U.S. Companies to Work with Huawei on 5G Technology About Huawei Huawei is a leading global provider of information and communications technology (ICT) infrastructure and smart devices. With integrated solutions across four key domains – telecom networks, IT, smart devices, and cloud services – we are committed to bringing digital to every person, home and organization for a fully connected, intelligent world.

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QOMPLX Releases The CMMC Pre-Assessment Solution to Prepare Defense Contractors to Pass Their CMMC Audit

QOMPLX | September 10, 2020

QOMPLX™, an intelligent decision platform provider, today announced the release of the CMMC Pre-Assessment, a solution to help prepare defense contractors to pass their Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) audit. The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) created CMMC to enhance the cybersecurity posture of the companies that make up the Defense Industrial Base (DIB). As part of this upcoming prerequisite, all 300,000+ DIB companies will be required to meet specific maturity levels to be awarded a contract from the DOD. Previously, companies could self-certify with the appropriate Defense Federal Acquisition Regulations (DFARS) and other regulations such as NIST 800-171, but CMMC now requires third-party auditors to validate if contractors are compliant with the required cybersecurity practices and procedures.

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Federal Aviation Administration Announces Chosen Vendors to Set Technology Standards for New Drone-Tracking System

Federal Aviation Administration | May 08, 2020

The eight vendors will set the technology standards for FAA’s Remote ID program to track drones and their operators. The rule created a framework for tagging drones with unique radio wave identifiers that are broadcast directly from the drone or over a Wi-Fi internet connection, depending on the method. The FAA is still working to finalize the proposed Remote ID rule, at which time the agency will also announce the application requirements for potential service suppliers. The Federal Aviation Administration announced the vendors chosen to develop the underlying technology and standards for tracking drones and their pilots as part of a new regulatory regime and marketplace. In December, the agency issued a proposed rule to establish a system for remotely identifying unmanned aerial vehicles—more colloquially known as drones—called Remote ID. The rule created a framework for tagging drones with unique radio wave identifiers that are broadcast directly from the drone or over a Wi-Fi internet connection, depending on the method. That unique ID could be picked up by air traffic control towers, law enforcement and the general public to ensure a level of safety and accountability. Read More: A new US government report explores how blockchains could be used to track drones carrying medical supplies The rule also established a marketplace of vendors—Remote ID UAS Service Suppliers, or Remote ID USS—to manage the ecosystem by ensuring each drone was assigned a unique ID and that the relevant data is available to those with authority to access it. Before FAA can create that marketplace, the agency needs to know exactly how it should be set up and what standards need to be met by all companies involved. On Wednesday, FAA announced eight companies that will help the agency set those standards: Airbus, AirMap, Amazon, Intel, One Sky, Skyward (a Verizon company), T-Mobile and Wing (a Google subsidiary). These eight vendors will work together to develop the technology requirements that other companies will use as they build systems to manage the Remote ID system. The FAA will be able to advance the safe integration of drones into our nation’s airspace from these technology companies’ knowledge and expertise on remote identification, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. The FAA is still working to finalize the proposed Remote ID rule, at which time the agency will also announce the application requirements for potential service suppliers. Wednesday’s announcement says the agency will also begin accepting applications at that time. Read More: CTA Demands Tariff Exemptions to the U.S. Government on Tech Products Made in China

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As a result of Russia purchasing ad content in the 2016 presidential elections and increased scrutiny about political advertising on the platform, Facebook changed its policy in 2018 and began making data on political advertising publicly available.