Building Local Government Support for Good Food

The Wallace Center at Winrock International

Local governments can be powerful partners for changing the food system. As the Good Food and local food movements continue to gain momentum and visibility, local officials are becoming more interested in how these initiatives can help their communities.
Watch Now

Spotlight

Modern vehicles contain multiple interfaces—connections between the vehicle and external networks—that leave vehicle systems, including safety-critical systems, such as braking and steering, vulnerable to cyberattacks. Researchers have shown that these interfaces—if not properly secured—can be exploited through direct, physical access to a vehicle, as well as remotely through shortrange and long-range wireless channels. For example, researchers have shown that attackers could compromise vulnerabilities in the short-range wireless connections to vehicles’ Bluetooth units—which enable hands-free cell phone use—to gain access to in-vehicle networks, to take control over safety-critical functions such as the brakes. Among the interfaces that can be exploited through direct access, most stakeholders we spoke with expressed concerns about the statutorily mandated on-board diagnostics port, which provides access to a broad range of vehicle systems for emissions and diagnostic testing purposes. However, the majority of selected industry stakeholders we spoke with (23 out of 32) agreed that wireless attacks, such as those exploiting vulnerabilities in vehicles’ built-in cellular-calling capabilities, would pose the largest risk to passenger safety. Such attacks could potentially impact a large number of vehicles and allow an attacker to access targeted vehicles from anywhere in the world. Despite these concerns, some stakeholders pointed out that such attacks remain difficult because of the time and expertise needed to carry them out and thus far have not been reported outside of the research environment.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

2018 OFCCP Developments: What Federal Contractors Need to Know for 2019

jdsupra

In 2018 the Trump-era OFCCP began issuing policy changes that provide indications how the agency is changing its enforcement approach and where the agency is headed. This year the OFCCP issued nine directives that will guide the agency’s enforcement agenda and provide guidance on how the agency interacts with contractors.
Watch Now

What Makes Local Government an Enticing Cyber Target

fortinet

State government, local government, and education institutions alike are prime targets for cyber criminals in search of highly valuable taxpayer and student data. Gain critical insights into this global threat landscape and understand how to safeguard organizations like yours from becoming the next breach headline.
Watch Now

Technology Forecast 2019: What State and Local Government Technology Officials Can Expect

Nascio

For this popular annual event, the NASCIO and PTI executive directors came together to provide their perspectives and commentary on the information technology priorities, trends and issues that will be impacting state and local governments for the coming year.
Watch Now

The False Claims Act: Recent Trends and Hot Topics

lorman

Since 2016, courts and government contractors have grappled with the implications of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision in Universal Health Services, Inc. United States ex rel. Escobar regarding the interpretation of the False Claims Act (FCA). Simultaneously, the Department of Justice has released several different, sometimes contradictory memoranda regarding the enforcement of the FCA, while continuing to collect billions of dollars each year from settlements with government contractors who violate the FCA.
Watch Now

Spotlight

Modern vehicles contain multiple interfaces—connections between the vehicle and external networks—that leave vehicle systems, including safety-critical systems, such as braking and steering, vulnerable to cyberattacks. Researchers have shown that these interfaces—if not properly secured—can be exploited through direct, physical access to a vehicle, as well as remotely through shortrange and long-range wireless channels. For example, researchers have shown that attackers could compromise vulnerabilities in the short-range wireless connections to vehicles’ Bluetooth units—which enable hands-free cell phone use—to gain access to in-vehicle networks, to take control over safety-critical functions such as the brakes. Among the interfaces that can be exploited through direct access, most stakeholders we spoke with expressed concerns about the statutorily mandated on-board diagnostics port, which provides access to a broad range of vehicle systems for emissions and diagnostic testing purposes. However, the majority of selected industry stakeholders we spoke with (23 out of 32) agreed that wireless attacks, such as those exploiting vulnerabilities in vehicles’ built-in cellular-calling capabilities, would pose the largest risk to passenger safety. Such attacks could potentially impact a large number of vehicles and allow an attacker to access targeted vehicles from anywhere in the world. Despite these concerns, some stakeholders pointed out that such attacks remain difficult because of the time and expertise needed to carry them out and thus far have not been reported outside of the research environment.

resources