CONTRACT INTERPRETATION

Federal Government Contract Training

This webcast explains the processes and principles that apply to the interpretation of federal government procurement contracts. These are matters that are not set out in any laws or regulations (including the FAR), but which are essential information for all personnel engaged in federal acquisition – not just lawyers.
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Spotlight

More than twenty million men, women and children around the world are currently believed to be victims of human trafficking, a global criminal industry estimated to be worth $150.2 billion annually.1 As defined in the US Department of State’s 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP Report), the terms “trafficking in persons” and “human trafficking” refer broadly to “the act of recruiting, harboring, transporting, providing, or obtaining a person for compelled labor or commercial sex acts through the use of force, fraud, or coercion,” irrespective of whether the person has been moved from one location to another.2 Trafficking in persons includes practices such as coerced sex work by adults or children, forced labor, bonded labor or debt bondage, involuntary domestic servitude, forced child labor, and the recruitment and use of child soldiers.3 Many different factors indicate that an individual may be in a situation of trafficking. Among the most clear-cut indicators are the experience of coercive or deceptive recruitment, restricted freedom of movement, retention of identity documents by employers, withholding of wages, debt bondage, abusive working and living conditions, forced overtime, isolation, and physical or sexual violence.


OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

Public contracting for social impact bonds

Government Outcomes Lab

Public contracting for social impact bonds (SIBs) is different to other agreements such as fee-for-service or grants. Unlike a standard services contract, which specifies in detail how services are to be provided, an outcomes-based contract will typically set out the outcomes to be achieved by the provider and the framework for when payments will be made.
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Employment Law for Government Contractors: Is Your Company Keeping Up?

fordharrison

Join FordHarrison partners Michelle Harkavy, Eric Su, and Johanna Zelman for a complimentary webinar designed to help government contractor employers navigate some of the thorniest employment law regulations.
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2017 American Community Survey Statistics

U.S. Department of Commerce

The U.S. Census Bureau will hold a webinar on Sept. 6 from 1-2 p.m. in advance of the Sept. 13 release of the 2017 American Community Survey statistics. The webinar will show participants how to access new data and online resources from the 2017 American Community Survey.
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Government vs. Commercial Contracting: A Regulatory Overview

Thompson Information Services

Contracting with the U.S. government can be profitable. But it can also be risky. Winning and keeping federal contracts involves strict procedures, including specific wages and fringe benefits that you must offer employees and subcontractors. Plus, if a government client changes (or cancels) your contract, it’s critical to know your rights and how to exercise them.
Watch Now

Spotlight

More than twenty million men, women and children around the world are currently believed to be victims of human trafficking, a global criminal industry estimated to be worth $150.2 billion annually.1 As defined in the US Department of State’s 2014 Trafficking in Persons Report (TIP Report), the terms “trafficking in persons” and “human trafficking” refer broadly to “the act of recruiting, harboring, transporting, providing, or obtaining a person for compelled labor or commercial sex acts through the use of force, fraud, or coercion,” irrespective of whether the person has been moved from one location to another.2 Trafficking in persons includes practices such as coerced sex work by adults or children, forced labor, bonded labor or debt bondage, involuntary domestic servitude, forced child labor, and the recruitment and use of child soldiers.3 Many different factors indicate that an individual may be in a situation of trafficking. Among the most clear-cut indicators are the experience of coercive or deceptive recruitment, restricted freedom of movement, retention of identity documents by employers, withholding of wages, debt bondage, abusive working and living conditions, forced overtime, isolation, and physical or sexual violence.

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