Modernizing the IT Infrastructure in Government with IDaaS

Okta, Inc.

Decades-old legacy technology with heavy maintenance cost and increasing cybersecurity risk have left federal government in need of a change. Federal CIO Tony Scott has said recently that by spending more and more money each year on simply maintaining legacy systems, agencies “have missed multiple generations of advancements in technology.” The time is now to modernize. Attend this webinar to learn how to leverage cloud technologies to drive agency efficiencies and radically cut costs.
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Spotlight

You’ve heard of Lean and you are intrigued. You are acquainted with the basic Lean tools and concepts such as Kaizen, the 8 wastes, root cause analysis, and process maps - but what are the next steps? The purpose of this guide is to help you get off to a good start on your Lean journey, including: Considering Lean. You first must consider if Lean is the right journey for you. Become aware of what a Lean organization looks like. Stephen Covey says “Begin with the end in mind.” Learning about Lean and the experiences of others and what they have accomplished puts you in a better position to begin the journey. The strategy for implementing Lean at home. Once you have learned about Lean you and decide it is the suitable journey for you, then you are ready to begin the Lean journey in your own organization. Building a Lean culture. Lean is not just collection of tools. It is a mindset and way of working. Lean will have its greatest impact when that mindset pervades the organization. Building support for Lean. Change is often hard for employees. Change is sometimes for employees so thought must be given on how to make the transition easier. However, this guide does not presume there is just one path for the Lean journey. Readers are encouraged to use the information in this report to create the path that works best for their organization. Finally, this guide does assume that the reader has some basic knowledge of Lean. If you are completely new to Lean please consider reading “Lean: Achieving Critical Mass” available for free on the GFOA website at www.gfoa.org or by emailing research@gfoa.org. 1 If you need a refresher on some of the most important terms and tools of Lean, please consult Appendix 3 to this report.

OTHER ON-DEMAND WEBINARS

FCC Disaster Preparedness: State & Local Government Officials

The FCC State

The FCC State and Local Government Webinar on Disaster Preparedness features an insightful presentation by Chris Anderson, Chief, Operations and Emergency Management Division, FCC Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau.
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Effective Communication and Service Strategies for Government Employees

lorman

Good customer service is difficult to find in private business and is almost non-existent in government. Many government employees are beaten down and defensive and hate their jobs but are often trapped and simply marking time until they can get their pension. Most people don't enjoy being difficult, but they have become calloused and just want customers to go away.
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Lobbying Law and Political Law Compliance for Government Contractors

THOMPSON GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING

The power shift in the House of Representatives means government contractors can expect increased oversight especially on lobbying and political activities.
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Government Email: Public or Private Record?

lorman

The explosion of information held by government agencies presents unique and growing challenges to those that must administer the public's access to government records. Questions persist about the scope of the government's duties in maintaining and producing electronically stored information. Particularly thorny questions arise in the area of personal email accounts.
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Spotlight

You’ve heard of Lean and you are intrigued. You are acquainted with the basic Lean tools and concepts such as Kaizen, the 8 wastes, root cause analysis, and process maps - but what are the next steps? The purpose of this guide is to help you get off to a good start on your Lean journey, including: Considering Lean. You first must consider if Lean is the right journey for you. Become aware of what a Lean organization looks like. Stephen Covey says “Begin with the end in mind.” Learning about Lean and the experiences of others and what they have accomplished puts you in a better position to begin the journey. The strategy for implementing Lean at home. Once you have learned about Lean you and decide it is the suitable journey for you, then you are ready to begin the Lean journey in your own organization. Building a Lean culture. Lean is not just collection of tools. It is a mindset and way of working. Lean will have its greatest impact when that mindset pervades the organization. Building support for Lean. Change is often hard for employees. Change is sometimes for employees so thought must be given on how to make the transition easier. However, this guide does not presume there is just one path for the Lean journey. Readers are encouraged to use the information in this report to create the path that works best for their organization. Finally, this guide does assume that the reader has some basic knowledge of Lean. If you are completely new to Lean please consider reading “Lean: Achieving Critical Mass” available for free on the GFOA website at www.gfoa.org or by emailing research@gfoa.org. 1 If you need a refresher on some of the most important terms and tools of Lean, please consult Appendix 3 to this report.

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